Next Steps

Prepositions

Play out the game. It will likely need to be played at least four times, and each time will likely be around 750 words, so the total for the section will likely be around 3000 words. Here is how to break it out:

  1. Introduction of phrase.
  2. Examination of preposition use.
  3. Analyze preposition use.
  4. Develop existing or create new preposition use.
  5. Draw the resultant idea and diagram, as possible.
  6. Evaluate the preposition use.

750 words will likely be used very quickly by braking things down into this format, so it might be necessary to use multiple 750 word units. If this is the case, they should be even and the total word count may go up to 6000 words, if one unit is not enough.

Senses

The senses have been outlined. Now, fill out the outlines with text. The touch one will end up covering most of the 22-25 senses, so this will need to be worked out. The senses to include are: sight, hearing, smell, taste, and the many versions of touch: touch, pressure, itch, cold thermoception, heat thermoception, tension, stretch, vibration, nociception, equilibrioception, chemoreception, thirst, hunger, as well as other senses such as time and magnetoreception.

It is important to look at the list of the senses and describe them through Bloom’s taxonomy, which is to remember, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate, and create. As a designer, it is important to include create, and that could be the main focus, but the other thinking skills can be addressed in the template. Furthermore, the create skill should be divided into input, thought or conditional phrase, and output.

Do not forgot or leave out the sensors and drawings, and more drawings and diagrams are likely necessary. Pull from the presentation, the website, and of course, new writing to be completed here and elsewhere.

140 Maple Street

Review the rooms. There should be at least three instances or narratives for each of the rooms. The story should meander through the house, room by room, as if we walk through the spaces.

Here is the list of the rooms:

  1. Foyer / Office
  2. Livingroom
  3. Dining Room
  4. Kitchen
  5. Sunroom
  6. Restroom
  7. Closet
  8. Den
  9. Stair Up to Second Floor
  10. Stair Down to Basement and Rear
  11. Closet
  12. Master
  13. Bedroom
  14. Bathroom
  15. Bedroom
  16. Bedroom Closet
  17. Basement
  18. Garage
  19. Deck
  20. Rear Yard

How do we develop the structure for this? Setting, Action, Effect, and what else? When developing the spaces, it is important to understand the background as the protagonist. The work is all about memory, and it will be crucial to include description through the senses– yes, steal from the senses work and divide it by sight, hearing, smell, taste, and the many versions of touch: touch, pressure, itch, cold thermoception, heat thermoception, tension, stretch, vibration, nociception, equilibrioception, chemoreception, thirst, hunger, as well as other senses such as time and magnetoreception, if that is an option.

What is most important about this is to focus on the structure, architecture, interior, and exterior as the narrative winds, expressing the history of the place. Be sure to include symbols and symbolism in the various rooms, but these do not have to be underlined and highlighted. Instead, subtle introduction of these and the senses will make the story much righer.

Mystery

Review the 12 chapter formula. Fill out the elements of the formula. There are some already outlined on Google Drive / Google Docs. There are about 30 sections to complete. Can you use 3000 words per section? If so, how does this breakdown? The Snowflake Method uses: Openings, Settings, Conflict and Obstructions, Endings.

Before starting the next phase of the mystery, review story, chapter, and section structure. This should help with meeting the writing requirements, and look at some of the best strategies to write and devise a story–is it better to start at the ending and work backwards? Is it better to start at the points of divergence? Although it is not the most important item in this list, it will be fun, so don’t ignore it.

Other Topics

There are already four items in a list of things to do, but are there others? You want to write, so where else can you exercise these skills? Do the kids want to write? It would be great to help Logan with a book and help him get into college. Carter has been working hard on the Crustacean Frustration–why cannot this be a book–is it better as an illustrated children’s book or a chapter book? Probably a illustrated book. Do we do the drawings? Probably at first.

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